Our Projects

Contact us to get more information regarding our projects. We will be able to provide information and findings.
N'hésitez pas à nous contacter pour avoir de l'informations et des résultats aux sujets de nos projets de recherche.

À propos de ce projet / About this project
English Consent is a tool that is currently being taught in many Canadian universities to help mitigate the culture of sexual assault. However, learning to practice consent at the age of a university student can be “awkward”, challenging, and require the unlearning of ingrained social habits. Teaching kids to identity their own and other’s boundaries, how to practice consent, and to use tools like active listening and check-ins at an early age engenders a culture of respect and personal empowerment, and hopefully helps prevent sexual assault and other cultures of abuse. Projet Bleuet has been promoting education of consent to kids in summer camps settings, in situation of conflicts (lack or absence of respect of boundaries of others) between two kids and in other situations such as hugging, physical games, etc. This research project explores and elaborates more about how the notion of consent can be incorporated in practices in other child-care contexts and in a school context, at an early age. It also looks to identify more situations or practices where it can be used.

Chargé.es de projet - Madelaine Sommers (Concordia University) and Chris Tegho (Projet Bleuet)
Collaborations - CURE Montreal

À propos de ce projet / About this project
English Gender, ability and racialization work together to affect the way that consent is taught and practiced. We are interested in exploring ways for childcare givers to respond to forms of oppressions using intersectional awareness and best-practices when it comes to consent.

Here is an excerpt from the previous paper that highlights what we are interested in expanding upon:

“One participant who has worked with both children and youth described the ways that gender and racialization work together to affect the way that consent is taught and practiced amongst caregivers, children and youth. This caregiver spoke to their experience seeing white children not respecting the body autonomy of children of colour, to white teen girls’ bodies and space being more respected than that of Black teen girls, and, in the case of Black teens and white teens working with younger kids, to how sensitive children were to those teens saying stop depending on their race.

The participant also described how children of colour, especially Black children and Black boys are often punished more severely as a result of their identities and behaviours being pathologized by adults in their lives. Participants expressed the importance of being acutely aware of these dynamics between children as well as within the actions of caregivers themselves.

Aside from recognition of and increased sensitivity to the ways that gender and racialization interact to affect the way that children experience consent through daily interactions, participants were unable to come to a consensus as to how they responded to such forms of oppression fortified in childcare practices. For example, one caregiver expressed a method she used of naming the difference and marginalization experienced as children of colour and girls; another participant disagreed, stating that such a tactic can be very “hit or miss,” and necessitates extensive background knowledge and training to be considered an option.” (Madelaine Sommers, 2016).

Chargé.es de projet - Sevrenne Sheppard (McGill University), Joey Akl and Chris Tegho (Projet Bleuet).
Collaborations - CURE Montreal

À propos de ce projet / About this project
Francais -

English This projects looks at some different childcare resources in Montreal that exist and how they are currently approaching the topic of inclusion. Do they have practices already in place around inclusion? What does inclusion mean for them? What do they think is missing?

Chargé.e de projet - Christopher Tegho
Collaborations - CURE Montreal

À propos de ce projet / About this project
Francais -

English The ministry of Education has legislation in place that guarantees students with access to individualized education plans that range invasiveness, from after-school tutoring to in patient treatments. Children deemed to have “serious psychological, cognitive, familial and/or behaviour problems” between the ages of 3 to 12 are admissible to multi-faceted inpatient treatment programs, including medication, “social skill development” and various forms of therapy. The goal of this inpatient program is to rapidly reintegrate students into the public school system by drastically interfering in behaviours or symptoms related to the child’s psychological, cognitive, familial circumstance. This project would explore the current realities of these special education programs in Quebec and Canada and any barriers --institutionalized or otherwise-- that prevent special education childcare providers from following supportive, anti-oppressive practices. This research project necessitates a critical analysis of coercive (medical) practises, psychiatric abuse, normative socialization, ableism, and other forms of oppression.
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